FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles (single serve, gluten free)

Garlic oil noodles seem to be a mainstay of Instagram and TikTok right now. Not one to miss out, I decided to develop a recipe for FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles. Needless to say, these noodles don’t have garlic. What they do have on their side, however, is a delicious, spicy kick and a very speedy cooking time. They also use these delicious, gluten free egg noodles from my cookbook, Intolerance Friendly Kitchen.

These FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles are a delicious snack or dinner for one. I’m currently quite into developing single serve recipes, as you might be able to tell from these single serve microwave cinnamon scrolls. As a single gal who cooks for a living, I love the idea of a quick and easy single serve without a family worth of leftovers at the end. Shall we dive in? 

An aerial view of a dark grey ceramic bowl filled with FODMAP friendly chilli oil noodles. The noodles are casually strewn in the bowl and topped with sesame seeds and spring onion greens. A fork sits twirled into the noodles in the top left hand side of the bowl. The bowl sits on dark grey mottled backdrop, creating a moody contrast with the bright red noodles

FODMAP NOTES AND SUBSTITUTION OPTIONS

Interestingly, Korean chilli flakes have a higher FODMAP content than regular chilli flakes. 2 teaspoons contain moderate amounts of fructose. If you have no issues with chilli, go ahead and use 2 teaspoons of Korean chilli flakes. If not, I have some suggestions below on how to cater these FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles to every chilli preference. 

A gluten free noodle with no high FODMAP flours (like besan) will work here. Make sure you read the labels.

To make these noodles vegan, use a vegan noodle and substitute the honey for maple syrup. To make them sesame free, omit the sesame seeds and sesame oil. Check to ensure no other ingredients contain sesame in case of an allergy. 

Needless to say, do not use peanut oil for peanut butter when catering to a peanut allergy. Make sure to check all the labels to ensure everything is nut free if you are. 

An aerial view of two white bowls of FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles. The bowls sit atop a light grey stone background, and one bowl is the centre of the image, while the other peeks out of the top lefthand corner. The bowl in the centre has a fork in it, poking out the top right hand side of the image. The noodles are casually topped with spring onion greens, toasted sesame seeds and cucumber batons

ON CHILLI 

  • I use and love Korean chilli flakes. They are milder than regular flakes, fruitier, and have a lovely bright red colour, even after adding the sizzling oil. I bought a big packet (1kg) when I was at an Asian grocer and they have lasted me over a year, with plenty left. I daresay you could also buy them online. 
  • Interestingly, Korean chilli flakes have a higher FODMAP content than regular chilli flakes. 2 teaspoons contain moderate amounts of fructose. If you have no issues with chilli/fructose, go ahead and use 2 teaspoons of Korean chilli flakes. If not, I have some suggestions below on how to cater these FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles to every chilli preference. 
  • Firstly, you can use regular chilli flakes. They are hotter than Korean chilli flakes, so you will need to add according to your taste. You can finish with some paprika for colour if you like – chilli flakes tend to make a muddier brown oil when compared to Korean chilli flakes.
  • Secondly, you can add 1 teaspoon Korean chilli flakes and a good extra grating of fresh ginger. I love adding ginger to these noodles because I think it adds a dimension that is missing without garlic. Raw ginger also adds a bit of heat, which will help balance out the lack thereof.
  • Another ingredient I like to add is pepper, whether that is Sichuan or regular. Sichuan has a numbing, spicy quality that is really delicious and unique. If you don’t have Sichuan, regular cracked pepper is great too. 

A close up, aerial view of a messy plate of FODMAP friendly chilli oil noodles. The noodles are casually strewn in the white bowl and their red hue contrasts with the spring onion greens and sesame seeds that garnish them. The bowl sits atop a light grey slate tile.

ON THE NOODLES 

I have used the gluten free egg noodle recipe from my cookbook here. I developed the recipe in response to the fact that there aren’t many gluten free egg noodle options available here in Australia. Noodles have a nostalgic element for me as I used to eat them after school as a kid. I wanted to recreate my favourite snack – noodles with Tamari and toasted sesame oil. I think the noodles in the book really hit that mark for me. You can buy the cookbook here.

I have seen people use regular gluten free spaghetti in place of noodles, too. This is a great, easy option for anybody who can’t eat egg or for a vegan option. I recommend Green Olive Organics spaghetti here in Australia – it’s wholegrain and made with a number of different grains. 

I should say that I haven’t tried this with gluten free pasta. I’m not sure if 125g gluten free pasta ends up to be more when cooked, as compared to noodles. As such, I can’t say for sure if you will have the right amount of sauce. I plan to test this and update the post, but I just thought I’d flag it here. 

An aerial view of a white bowl of FODMAP friendly chilli oil noodles. The noodles are casually strewn about in the bowl, and topped with cucumber batons, spring onion greens and sesame seeds. The bowl sits atop a dark grey steel backdrop, which contrasts with the white bowl and vibrant chilli red tinted hue of the noodles

OPTIONAL ADDITIONS

  • Some finely sliced cucumber batons are a nice addition of crunch here. They also provide some cooling from the heat of the chilli oil.
  • Some pre-cooked (or not) sliced tofu also helps ramp up the protein. 
  • If you eat eggs, a fried egg on top would also make these FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles more of a complete dish.
  • I like adding 2-3 teaspoons of smooth, natural peanut butter here. If you can’t have peanuts, tahini also works really well (although I would cap the tahini at 2 teaspoons). 
  • Steamed Asian greens such as pak choi or bok choi make a great addition. In the same vein, you can throw in any steamed vegetables you like. Keep in mind, though, that you will throw off the balance of sauce to noodle. You might consider making double the sauce and then adding extra as needed to coat everything. Extras can be stored in the fridge to serve with a protein or rice the next day. 

An aerial view of two white bowls of FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles. The bowls sit atop a light grey stone background, and one bowl is the centre of the image, while the other peeks out of the top lefthand corner. The bowl in the centre has a fork in it, poking out the top right hand side of the image. The noodles are casually topped with spring onion greens and toasted sesame seeds

INGREDIENT NOTES

Black rice vinegar has a sweet, almost watered down balsamic vinegar taste without as strong of an acidic tang. It’s a lovely ingredient here and lends just a bit of acid without being overbearing. You can use white rice vinegar if you don’t have it, but I recommend adding 1/2 teaspoon at first and building up if you like it more acidic.

For colour, I highly recommend using dark soy sauce. In Australia, Ayam brand makes gluten free dark soy sauce. You also also use Tamari, but your noodles might have a different colour. 

Interestingly, their website suggests that dark soy is less salty than regular soy. I was under the impression it was saltier! But a quick Google tells me I have been living a lie. So, if you plan to use Tamari instead of dark soy sauce, use less than the recipe specifies. 

Garlic chives are found at Asian grocers. They are related to chives, but have a flat blade leaf and a garlic flavour. I really like using them, but they easily omitted if you don’t live nearby. 

A close up aerial view of FODMAP friendly chilli oil noodles in a white ceramic bowl. A fork pokes out of the top left hand side of the bowl, extending across to the right. The bowl sits atop a dark blue metal backdrop. The noodles are casually strewn in the bowl and topped with sesame seeds and spring onion greens

RECIPE TIPS FOR YOUR FODMAP-FRIENDLY CHILLI OIL NOODLES

The aim of the sauce is to have the oil hot enough that is sizzles on impact and melds the flavours. I find there is less risk of burning the chilli flakes here than when making chilli oil. Because there are other ingredients in the bowl (like spring onion greens) it lessens the burny impact. That said, the oil really only needs a minute to get screaming hot (particularly on a gas stove). 

Regular chilli flakes will create a muddier coloured sauce than Korean chilli flakes. The colour won’t affect the flavour, of course. That said, they’re also spicier so make sure you add them to taste.

A close up aerial view of a messy white bowl of FODMAP friendly garlic oil noodles. The noodles are a deep red hue and topped with sesame seeds and spring onion greens. The grey stone backdrop is visible underneath the bowl in the bottom of the image

An aerial view of two white bowls of FODMAP-friendly chilli oil noodles. The bowls sit atop a light grey stone background, and one bowl is the centre of the image, while the other peeks out of the top lefthand corner. The bowl in the centre has a fork in it, poking out the top right hand side of the image. The noodles are casually topped with spring onion greens, toasted sesame seeds and cucumber batons

FODMAP friendly chilli oil noodles

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Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 5 mins
Servings 1 person

Ingredients
  

  • 2 teaspoons Korean chilli flakes see notes and body of post
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1-2 tablespoons spring onion greens finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
  • 1-2 teaspoons garlic chives optional finely chopped
  • Crushed Sichuan pepper or cracked black pepper according to your tastes
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons vegetable peanut or toasted sesame oil (see notes)
  • 1 – 1/2 tablespoons gluten free dark soy sauce see notes
  • 1 teaspoon honey or maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon black rice vinegar see notes
  • 2 teaspoons smooth natural peanut butter or tahini optional, see notes
  • 125-150 g gluten free egg noodles see notes
  • Extra spring onion greens to garnish (optional)
  • Extra sesame seeds to garnish (optional)
  • 1/2 cucumber julienned (optional)

Instructions
 

  • Start the process of cooking your noodles. If you’re using the noodles from the cookbook, they take 2-3 minutes.
  • Place the chilli flakes, ginger, spring onion greens, sesame oil, (optional) garlic chives and pepper in a heatproof bowl. Stir them up, then arrange them into a small pile (this makes it easier for the small quantity of oil to interact with all the ingredients).
  • In a small saucepan over a medium heat, heat the oil until it’s really hot and shimmering. Pour this hot oil over the chilli mixture. It should sizzle up and make the oil lovely and fragrant. If you’re using Korean chilli flakes, it should also take on a lovely red colour.
  • Add the dark soy sauce, honey or maple and black rice vinegar. Stir to combine, then taste and adjust to your liking.
  • If you’re using it, add the peanut butter or tahini and stir to combine.
  • Drain your noodles and add them to the chilli sauce. Toss gently to coat, then top with extra spring onion greens, sesame seeds and perhaps a few cucumber batons before eating.

Notes

  • 2 teaspoons contain moderate amounts of fructose. If you have no issues with chilli, go ahead and use 2 teaspoons of Korean chilli flakes. If not, you can use regular chili flakes to taste (they are spicier, so go easy) and some paprika for colour. You can also use 1 teaspoon Korean chilli flakes and extra freshly grated ginger to make up the heat. You could also add some Sichuan or regular pepper.
  • Garlic chives are available from Asian grocers and add a little bit of garlic flavour to FODMAP dishes. They are optional, though, so no stress if you don’t have any.
  • Toasted sesame oil is not generally supposed to be cooked to a high heat as it loses it’s flavour. I find that it is an easy flavour booster, even when cooked, so I use it. Know that isn’t generally how it is used. You can also use 1/2 tablespoon less oil in the sauce and then drizzle some toasted sesame on top for a nice hit.
  • I love using gluten free dark soy sauce here for the colour it adds. You can use Tamari if you don’t have dark soy, but use 2-3 teaspoons and see how you like it. Tamari is saltier than dark soy sauce.
  • Black rice vinegar has a sweet, almost watered down balsamic vinegar taste without as strong of an acidic tang. It's a lovely ingredient here and lends just a bit of acid without being overbearing. You can use white rice vinegar if you don't have it, but I recommend adding 1/2 teaspoon at first and building up if you like it more acidic. 
  • The peanut butter or Tahini is just an option for a slightly creamier noodle. They taste delicious either way.
  • I have used the gluten free egg noodles from my cookbook, Intolerance Friendly Kitchen, for my tests and these photos. 
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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