FODMAP friendly peanut sauce two ways + a quick gado gado (vegan, gluten free)


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FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com
FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com

Gado Gado

Gluten free, FODMAP friendly, Vegetarian
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time40 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 quantity satay, see above recipes
  • 1-2 boiled eggs per person
  • 1-2 cucumbers per person, sliced or chopped
  • 1-2 medium potatoes per person, boiled
  • 1 small bag bean sprouts
  • 1-2 carrots per person, chopped into batons
  • 1-2 red chillies, chopped
  • Handful of green beans (I forgot to add mine)
  • 1 cup (or so) red or white cabbage, lightly steamed

Instructions

  • Assemble all the ingredients on a large platter with the satay in the middle. The ingredients can be hot or cold, depending on what you fancy. Serve immediately. 

FODMAP friendly peanut sauce seems like a bit of a lie, on the surface. We’re generally accustomed to a peanut sauce or satay full to the brim with onion, garlic and shallots. Then there is the gluten containing soy sauce, the kecap manis (more gluten) and the fish or shrimp sauce. A whole lot of ingredients unsuitable for a FODMAPper. But then a hero comes along: FODMAP friendly peanut sauce. Not one, but two ways, because I appreciate that grinding fresh peanuts is not everyones idea of fun.

So, two different FODMAP friendly peanut sauces. The first, a more traditional one using freshly roasted peanuts, ground in a mortar and pestle. A little more elbow grease and time is involved, but in my biased opinion it is worth every second. Fear not, however, there is a second option – a quick weeknight satay sauce made with natural peanut butter. Quick, simple and equally delicious.

FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com
FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com

FODMAP FRIENDLY PEANUT SAUCE + FODMAPs

A few substitutes are necessary to create a friendly satay. Firstly, this recipe uses Tamari (gluten free soy sauce) and sweetener, instead of kecap manis. Kecap manis is generally made with soy (containing gluten) and golden syrup (a borderline sweetener) so I normally make my own. In this instance, however, I’ve tried to make the satay sauce as speedy as possible, so I’ve just added the Tamari and sweetener as is.

Personally, shallots don’t agree with me at all, irrespective of whether or not only the green parts are used. If you’re ok with shallots, or with garlic oil, please feel free to add some as you see fit.

Kaffir lime is basically air to me, so I keep a stash of them in my freezer to get my through the unseasonal months. As far as my research suggests, their season is Australian summer, and they can be bought at many Asian grocers across the city. If you like in North Melbourne, Minh Phat grocers generally always stock them, along with kaffir lime leaves. I highly recommend sourcing them, if you can.

FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com
FODMAP friendly vegan satay sauce + quick Gado Gado from www.georgeats.com

NOTES

While I have used the satay for a Gado Gado salad, it can be used in any manner you’d normally use satay. On it’s own, the satay is vegan and vegetarian friendly. Obviously if you add the eggs it will no longer be vegan, but you can substitute tofu in place of eggs for a vegan Gado Gado.

I have obviously given quantities (this is a recipe, after all) but personally I think satay sauce is quite subjective. Things like sweetness, salinity, tartness and heat are all very personal preferences. I would advise starting at the minimum quantity I have specified, and tasting as you go.

As the title suggests, there are two options for a FODMAP friendly satay here. Both are vegan, gluten free and (in case you had missed all my keywording) FODMAP friendly. The primary difference is the use of fresh peanuts and a bit of elbow grease, vs natural peanut butter and a little less elbow grease.

I should state for the record that, in comparing the two side by side, the ‘from scratch’ recipe is a clear winner. It takes a little more time and effort, sure. But I

FODMAP friendly satay sauce + a quick gado gado (gluten free, grain free, vegetarian, FODMAP friendly) from www.georgeats.com
FODMAP friendly satay sauce + a quick gado gado (gluten free, grain free, vegetarian, FODMAP friendly) from www.georgeats.com

FODMAP friendly, vegan satay from scratch

Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time50 mins

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1 cup 140g freshly roasted peanuts, skins removed if they have skins on
  • 4 kaffir lime leaves
  • 2 teaspoons kaffir lime zest
  • 1 tablespoon grated ginger
  • 1/2-2 red chillies chopped
  • 1 can of coconut milk check it has no fillers
  • 2-4 tablespoons Tamari to taste
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 1/2 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1/2 tablespoon tamarind paste
  • Salt and generous white pepper to taste
  • Squeeze of fresh lime juice to taste

Instructions

METHOD

  • Heat the peanut oil in a large saucepan or skillet over a medium heat. Once hot, add the peanuts, kaffir lime leaves and zest, grated ginger and chillies. Turn the heat to low, and cook for 3-5 minutes until fragrant.
  • Use a slotted spoon to carefully transfer the peanuts and flavourings (except the kaffir lime leaves – leave those in the pan) to a mortar and pestle. You could potentially use a food processor, but make sure you allow the mixture to cool completely if you intend to do so.
  • Add the brown sugar to the peanuts in the mortar and pestle, and pound the mixture until most of the peanuts are crushed. You’re looking for the consistency of a very dry crunchy peanut butter.
  • Return the crushed peanuts to the pan, and turn the heat to medium. Once the peanuts are sizzling again, pour in the coconut milk, and stir thoroughly to combine.
  • Once combined, add the remaining ingredients except the lime juice, tasting and adjusting as you go. Start with the minimum suggestions, and work your way up to a flavour that suits you. You can also add more chilli sauce (I use Tabasco) if you want an additional chilli hit.

FODMAP friendly vegan satay with natural peanut butter

Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 4 kaffir lime leaves
  • 2 teaspoons kaffir lime zest
  • 1 tablespoon grated ginger
  • 1/2-2 red chillies finely chopped
  • 140 g under 1 cup natural (nothing added but peanuts and salt) peanut butter, smooth or crunchy
  • 1 can of coconut milk check it has no fillers
  • 2-5 tablespoons Tamari to taste
  • 2-4 cup rice wine vinegar to taste
  • 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup to taste
  • Salt and generous white pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tablespoon tamarind paste
  • Squeeze of lime juice to taste

Instructions

METHOD

  • Add the peanut oil to a large saucepan, and place over a low-medium heat. Once hot, add the kaffir lime leaves and zest, chillies and ginger, and cook for 3-5 minutes until fragrant, but not burned.
  • Add the peanut butter, and stir throroughly to combine. It will take a few minutes for it to loosen up. Once it has, add the coconut milk, and stir very well to combine.
  • Add the remaining ingredients, tasting and adjusting as you go. Cook until the mixture is nicely combined and fragrant – about 5-10 minutes. Allow the mixture to cool, tasting and adjusting the seasoning/lime juice as you go. Keeps well in the fridge for a couple of days.

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