Citrus, haloumi, avocado, dill and radicchio salad with maple toasted pepitas

Have you ever heard of the term ‘recipe not recipe?’ Good, because you’re about to get a recipe not recipe for salad. I posted this salad on Instagram a few days ago and was overwhelmed by requests to post the recipe online. As such, much to your dismay, I’m sure, there is no lengthy spiel to accompany this post. There is no ‘here’s how I happened upon this salad recipe, because I’ve already laid that out – the ‘gram.

What I will say, though, is that this salad is super easy, in addition to being FODMAP friendly, gluten free, and vegetarian. If you’re here for the halloumi, try the honey and butter roasted carrot salad with halloumi, herb sauce and fennel, or the spice roasted pumpkin halloumi salad with pomegranate and preserved lemon herb sauce!

Halloumi, radicchio and citrus salad from www.georgeats.com

Halloumi, citrus, avocado and dill salad from www.georgeats.comFOR THE SALAD:

  • 1 block of haloumi (these vary from 180-250g in Australia – get whatever – we all know more haloumi is better)
  • 1-2 juicy oranges
  • 1-2 juicy red grapefruits
  • 1/2 a head of raddicchio
  • 1/2-1 avocado
  • Handful of dill
  • Good quality olive oil and sea salt, to garnish
  • 1/4 cup pepitas
  • 1-2 teaspoons maple syrup

TO MAKE:

  1. Slice and peel your oranges and grapefruits using whatever method you prefer. I am particularly juvenile in that I like to slice and then trim, but, as this is a recipe not recipe, you can do whatever you like!
  2. Tear or slice your radicchio into bite site chunks. You can place it in a bowl to be tossed, or arrange it straight on the plate.
  3. To cook your haloumi, place a nonstick pan over a medium high heat. Allow it to heat for a few minutes before adding a very scant teaspoon of oil – enough to grease the pan, but not enough to ‘fry’ the haloumi. Once the oil is hot, cook the haloumi, watching constantly and turning the heat down if necessary. Haloumi goes from golden brown to charcoal in the scroll of an Instagram post.
  4. Once the haloumi is cooked, transfer it to the salad, and return the pan to the heat. Add the pepitas, and cook for a minute or two, until lightly coloured. Pour over the maple syrup, and swish around to pick up all the delicious fried haloumi bits.
  5. Arrange the avo, and then sprinkle the dill and maple pepitas atop the salad, and finish with a drizzle of great olive oil, and a good pinch of two of Maldon sea salt. So easy so good.

Halloumi, citrus, avocado and dill salad from www.georgeats.com

5 replys to Citrus, haloumi, avocado, dill and radicchio salad with maple toasted pepitas

    1. Hello! I’ve researched this before out of confusion and found that it can be spelled either way – I’m not sure if the spelling has to do with where the haloumi is produced (ie maybe if it’s not produced in Cyrpus, it can’t legally be spelt with the 2 l’s? I’m not sure) but what I most regularly find in Melbourne supermarkets is haloumi with one l 🙂

      1. Hi again, I see this spelling problem again and again.
        I am from🇨🇾 Cyprus and can tell you that there is only one correct spelling worldwide , as is ,for every cheese, the spelling is not changed , and well if in other countries it’s spelt differently, that doesn’t make it alright.
        I can just imagine what the Brits or Italians would say if let’s say Cheddar was spelt Chedar ! or Parmesan-Parmessan!
        I do understand your quandary though, there is only ONE original Halloumi , and that’s from Cyprus,.It has been made here by artisan cheese makers for millennia and we are happy and proud that it is liked worldwide, but that does not give any producer of cheese, in any country , the right to change the spelling of a cheese.
        As a blogger though,there is a responsibility to use the correct spelling of food, so that others don’t make the same mistake,so easily done.
        ευχάριστα! Many thanks

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